http://blogs.plos.org/absolutely-maybe/open-access-2014-a-year-that-data-cracked-through-secrecy-and-myth/

Traces of McLuhan – A Media Sprint at the Marshall McLuhan Salon

Unbenannt

In late November, the Hybrid Publishing Consortium held a one day workshop at the Marshall McLuhan Salon in the Canadian Embassy in Berlin. This intense and positively stirring event brought together McLuhan scholars and software developers who all shared their views on working with and publishing from the archive. Together we mapped out these perspectives, potential needs and approaches.

The day concluded with a practical session hosted by Erich Decker and Matthias Helmut Guth from Cluster Asia Europe at the Heidelberg University. After showcasing their cross media annotation tools, they walked us through the technology, applying it to the specific case of the McLuhan archive and its video and textual content. Naturally this session could only raise awareness of what can be done and provide a feel for the workflow—it’s only just the beginning.

Hence, in early 2015 we plan, together with participants from the workshop, to complete two smaller projects that will focus on two particular works within the archive and employ the technology introduced during the media sprint. The aim will be to create small, tangible packages that can be used for educational purposes and the promotion of the archive and its content. More on that soon.

Happy new year!

Amongst the participants were Delphine Bedel, Sabine Claßnitz, Peter Cornwell, Eric Lars Decker, Baruch Gottlieb, Matthias Helmut Guth, Stephen Kovats, Alexander Kramer, Heinz-Günter Kuper, Martina Leeker and Steffi Winkler.

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http://www.snf.ch/de/fokusForschung/newsroom/Seiten/news-141218-pilotprojekt-publikationen.aspx

Can Open Access save the scholarly monograph? Scholarly monographs, long the gold standard for scholars in the humanities and social sciences, have been in a downward spiral for some time. Might Knowledge Unlatched, under the direction of Manchester University Press CEO Frances Pinter, finally offer hope for a turnaround? Read Michael Kelley’s report on Frances Pinter’s OA initiative here.

After Scholarly Kitchen published an article on new confusion arising with the CC-BY license standards, a discussion arose on the usage of CC-BY and corporate recycling of data. Read the full post plus comments here.

PLOS has done research on the widespread reluctance to share research data with scientific communities. The hypotheses that authors fear reanalysis may expose errors in their work or may produce conclusions that contradict their own. Read about their findings here.

The third OA Tools Meeting by the Open Access Toolset Alliance happened recently. The minutes of the meeting have been made available here.

Recent moves by established journals to make research papers freely available signpost the direction of travel in academic publishing. The Guardian has published an article on research releases in digital times. Read the full post here.

The collective papers of Albert Einstein have been made open access. Where? Here!

[flickr_photostream user_id=”128070284@N07″]
Photos are shot by Hannes Harnack and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) license.

The Team of the Hybrid Publishing Lab at the Post-Digital Scholar Conference 2014

The Team of the Hybrid Publishing Lab at the Post-Digital Scholar Conference 2014

The con­fe­rence “Post-Di­gi­tal Scho­lar: Pu­blis­hing bet­ween Open Ac­cess, Pi­ra­cy and the Pu­blic Sphe­re” tur­ned in a good score­card with nine ses­si­ons, three work­shops, about 130 par­ti­ci­pants and 950 tweets. Or­ga­ni­zed by the Hy­brid Pu­blis­hing Lab, the con­fe­rence took place in Lüne­burg from 12 to 14 No­vem­ber 2014. In this re­port you can read more about the to­pics dis­cus­sed by in­ter­na­tio­nal scho­lars, pu­blis­hers, re­se­ar­chers, pro­gramm­ers, ar­tists and busi­ness ma­na­gers. Pu­blis­hers, en­tre­pre­neurs, li­bra­ri­ans, ar­tists and scho­lars came to­ge­ther in the Lüne­burg Mu­sic School from 12 to 14 No­vem­ber 2014 to dis­cuss the chal­len­ges and chan­ces for scho­lar­ly com­mu­ni­ca­ti­on in the di­gi­tal age. How are the wri­ting of aca­de­mic texts and the book for­mat chan­ging? What role should li­bra­ries play in the fu­ture? How can the de­mand for open ac­cess to scho­lar­ship be sa­tis­fied in an eco­no­mi­cal and aca­de­mi­cal­ly re­s­pon­si­ble way? And how can tra­di­tio­nal aca­de­mic pu­blis­hing hou­ses keep pace with the­se de­ve­lop­ments? The­se ques­ti­ons and others were in­ten­se­ly dis­cus­sed and so­me­ti­mes hot­ly de­ba­ted in nine pa­nels and three work­shops at the con­fe­rence “The Post-Di­gi­tal Scho­lar: Pu­blis­hing bet­ween Open Ac­cess, Pi­ra­cy, and the Pu­blic Sphe­re”. Continue Reading…

post-digital-scholar-conference-2014-hybrid-publishingThis is the first blog entry of a #pdsc14 review series on the Post-Digital Scholar Conference 2014 written by Luca Brennecke, Student of the Leuphana University.

Everything is becoming Digital. MP3 crushed the vinyl record, YouTube obsoleted the DVD, and now the Kindle is scaring bookshops, publishers and authors alike. As the ephemerality of the Digital is disrupting the analog world order, there’s hardly any realm of our lives that is not at the brink of deep transformation. So is the case with academia. Once the pillar of Truth, the secularized religion of the 20th century, the archaic walls of academia are being sieged from from all sides. Continue Reading…

http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2014/09/16/academic-publishing-path-dependence-qwerty/

The last day of the Post-Digital Scholar Conference is over. Thanks to everyone who joined our #pdsc14 conference. It was thought provoking and inspiring conference and we had a great time! If you missed the conference, you can review the event in our third part of favorite #pdsc14 pickings – and don’t miss the outtakes on the bottom of this post or the other reviews: Continue Reading…

It has been a great start at the Post-Digital Scholar Conference – Day 1. If you missed day two or the whole conference, you can review the event in our second part of favorite #pdsc14 pickings – and don’t miss the outtakes on the bottom of this post: Continue Reading…

post-digital-scholar-conference-logo-o-leuphanaBefore I go into the first part of the Twitter Review of the Post-Digital Scholar Conference – Day 1, I’d like to thank everyone that joined this event. The Conference was certainly not my first conference this year, but it was (not surprisingly) one of my favorite.

But lets start with our favorite pickings of the first conference day – and don’t miss the outtakes on the bottom of this post or the other Reviews: Continue Reading…

Publishing between Open Access, Piracy and Public Spheres: New media is dead! Long live new media! For three days, publishers, researchers, programmers, designers, artists, and entrepreneurs will discuss how research and publishing in the humanities have changed over the past decade. The conference will explore new tools for gathering knowledge, examine platforms for multimedia publishing, or collaborative writing experiments.

Participants will focus on the interplay between pixels and print, and discuss open and closed modes of knowledge, in order to seek out what this elusive thing could be: post-digital knowledge.

You can download the conference poster here and the final program (PDF) here.

Follow the Conference on Twitter:

Jonas LiepmannJonas Liepmann is the founder of iversity. He studied cultural studies at the Humboldt-University, Berlin as well as comparative literary sciences at the Freie Universität Berlin. During his studies he developed the concept of iversity, for which he earned the financial support of EXIST – Gründen aus der Wissenschaft as well as of the EU, the state Brandenburg and private capital investors. Since the end of 2013 iversity offers MOOCs that have attracted more than 500.000 registered users to the platform.

Hybrid Publishing Lab: Are you working on anything at the moment that relates to our conference on post-digital scholarship or did you come across something interesting lately that deals with that topic? Continue Reading…

LandgrebeJonathan Landgrebe studied in Göttingen, Lyon, Berkeley and Munich and obtained his Ph.D. in Munich in field of economics, political sciences and law. In 2001 Jonathan joined the Center for Digital Technology and Management (CDTM), an interdisciplinary institute of LMU and TU Munich, to build up CDTM as a research institution and study program in digital technology management and entrepreneurship and became co-founder of a company in the converging field of digital publishing. His passion for books and literature and his experience in digital publishing made Jonathan join Suhrkamp, where he has been Managing Director since 2008. His work focuses on literature as well as non-fiction. He also he took over responsibilities for digital publishing at Suhrkamp.

Hybrid Publishing Lab: As part of the managing board you are in charge of the department of New Media. Will New Media decide the fate of publishers, or is the printed book here to stay? Continue Reading…

http://www.citeulike.org/group/13803