Over the course of the last year we were working hard on establishing an experimental publishing outlet for the Hybrid Publishing Lab. As our first publication is finally completed we are happy to introduce meson press to you. Run by members of the lab the aim of meson press is to publish high quality Open Access monographs. Even though the scholarly book is changing its face in the age of digital media, we strongly believe in the many virtues of its format for academic communication. Some might claim that the book is dead. Nevertheless we are aiming to reinvent the book by developing creative solutions for scholarly publishing in the digital age.

meson press publishes research on digital cultures and networked media. Its publications challenge contemporary theories and advance key debates in the humanities today.

 

Rethinking Gamification
Today our first book will be released: Our friends of the Gamification Lab at the Centre for Digital Cultures of Leuphana University of Lüneburg have put together a formidable volume of articles that seek to rethink gamification. The book offers a candid assessment of the current gamification hype by tracing back its historical roots as well as exploring novel design practices and methods. The contributions to “Rethinking Gamification” (edited by Mathias Fuchs, Sonia Fizek, Paolo Ruffino and Niklas Schrape) furthermore critically discuss the social implications of this phenomenon and present artistic tactics for resistance. Read the full publication here. It’s open access!

Join us on Monday, June 30th, 2014, at 7 p.m. for the official book release of “Rethinking Gamification” at Mond­ba­sis (Lüner­tor­s­traße 20, Lüne­burg, Germany). Let’s talk about Gamification, future books to come, and upcoming topics. And last, but not least, let’s celebrate.

 

This week’s list of links starts with an entry posted on the Many Possibilities blog. The blog is maintained by Steve Song, Founder of Village Telco, a social enterprise that builds low-cost WiFi mesh VoIP technologies to deliver affordable voice and Internet in underserviced areas. His newest entry, titled “The Morality of Openness”, deals with the language of openness and uses three contemporary books to illustrate, how “Openness” is possibly not the right word to frame the movement that everyone seems to be passionately discussing.

In an attempt to cut through the relentless TED Talk-like optimism of ed tech marketing, this year at the HASTAC conference in Peru Sava Saheli Singh and Tim Maughan presented a series of fictional case studies on the future of technology in education. Within their presentation, they point to the fact that technologies are here, and available, however, they are not evenly distributed. View the case studies on medium.com.

On the New York Review of Books, Steve Coll applies himself to reviewing Brad Stone’s book “The Everything Store. Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon” (ironically, the link on the nybooks site, just like here, leads to amazon.com). The book tells the story of Amazon founder Jeff Bezos and Coll, with Stone, takes a critical look on the omnipotence that is Amazon. Read the full review here.

Endre Dányi and Joe Deville have recently taken part in a workshop on Experiments in Knowledge Production. The event brought together a number of OA publishing initiatives to examine the challenges of OA publishing and how these are faced in practice. On the Blog of the Centre for the Study of Invention & Social Process in Goldsmith, they have published their reflections on the workshop.

The Swiss National Science Foundation has interviewed the historian Monica Dommann on copyright logics and her new book on the history of copyright. Read what she has to say about debates on copyright and what that has to do with freedom and equality here.

Taylor & Francis apologises over censorship incident (without saying ‘sorry’ or ‘censorship’)

Scanning entire books falls under fair use policy according to a recent ruling

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“The First E-Book Fair in Germany”: The Electric Book Fair is an attempt at being able to view something that by its very nature must remain diffuse and undefinedbecause it is continually changing – a paradoxical but nevertheless worthwhile endeavour.

Find More Information here.

The Guardian is doing a round of Self-Publishing Q&As today. Join in between 1pm and 2.30pm and ask all you ever wanted to know about self-publishing. The panelists include Daniel Cooke of New Generation Publishing, Craig Pennington - editor-in-chief of the independent music magazine Bido Lito!, and several others.

Also in The Guardian, Ian Sample, Science editor, explains how secrecy over academic journal publishing contracts can veil the fact that many institutions are paying too much for journals.The article is just another in the last couple of months that criticize Elsevier’s paywalls.

The Indian non-profit Pratham Books, which publishes children’s books in local languages, has posted an article on self-publishing as an Indian tradition. In the article, Mahan Hazarika explains the benefits self-publishing has specifically for India, and how India measures up with other countries when it comes to publishing strategies.

HASTAC has extended an invite to participate in the Making Learning Connected MOOC. Sign ups are now open for the second Summer Learning Party, where participants will be encouraged to “hack thy writing”.

In a world where an ever increasing amount of data is generated and collected, those publishing the data must pay greater attention to putting the data into context, to increase its usability and impact – claims Alicia Asin, the co-founder and CEO of hardware provider Libelium, as expressed in a recent blog post on Gigaom. Asin explains “while it is true that we have access to more information than ever before, we are not experts on every subject. Thus, it is very difficult to digest it. My concern is that over-information is the new way of hiding information. If we demand context and facts instead of dumb numbers, the biggest legacy of the internet of things will be a world that is more transparent and democratic.“

Kevin Shively has recently reviewed LinkedIn’s publishing options and was surprised at how well the post performed. Read his full article on how data can help plan your posts on Simplymeasured.

Picture by Mutant669 published under CC-BY-SA

Picture by Mutant669 licensed under Creative Commons (CC BY-SA)

You may remember the debates that were sparked by a piece entitled ‚What are we to do with feral publishers?’ in the UK. This debate has now continued with a further position piece by the Leicester academics David Harvie, Geoff Lightfoot, Simon Lilley and Kenneth Weir written for the journal Prometheus entitled ‘Publishers, be damned! From price gouging to the open road’. The debate, consisting of the proposition piece and responses, including one written by myself, Steffen Böhm and Chris Land, is now published and available in open access. However, its story is rather remarkable, as is the outcome. Continue Reading…

Libraries’ online books database protected under ‘fair use’, court rules

analog-3-leuphana-book-print-eventIs there a future for printed newspapers and books? How can publishing houses and editorial departments deal with the digital shift? These were some of the questions discussed by the around 60 regional participants of the third part of the Leuphana University ANALOG event-series in Lüneburgs City Archive. Following an invitation by the Innovation-Incubator research project Hybrid Publishing Lab at the Centre for Digital Cultures (CDC), peers and experts from all across the media industry joined the interested public in a discussion about the digitization of media. The event was marked by an exchange of experiences in the publishing world, and the aim was to name and face current challenges in the thick of digitization.  Continue Reading…

A Literature Review on Open Access Publishing (PDF)

More than 60 people attended when Dr. Mercedes Bunz discussed with representatives of the regional publishing industry in the ANALOG conference series in the Lüneburg Stadtarchiv. Thanks to everybody involved, the event resulted in an informative and smooth running evening. Read more about the outputs and results of the event soon.
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The workshop (closed) is part of an ongoing series of events and research publishing for coordination and interoperability between stakeholders in the open source digital publishing research community.

In the workshop we would explore these three topics:

  •     What standards are we each using in our workflows
  •     What do these standards need to address in our workflows
  •     Looking towards interoperability in API standards for multi-format publishing

Date: 2nd and 3rd July 2014 at the Hybrid Publishing Lab, Innovation Inkubator, Leuphana University, Lüneburg Continue Reading…

mercedes-bunz-christian-heise-future-bookAn interview on the future of the book with Dr. Mercedes Bunz and Christian Heise, who are researchers in the Hybrid Publishing Lab and part of the EU project Innovation Incubator at the Centre for Digital Cultures at Leuphana University of Lüneburg. Continue Reading…

Last month, Hybrid Publishing team member Michael Dieter took part in a book sprint on book sprints, the full text of which is available to download below. Part theorization, part “how to guide,” this is a first attempt to reflect on an emerging short form method of collaborative writing.

Link to the full text: http://www.booksprints.net/2014/05/book-sprint-on-book-sprints/

Five hundred million tweets are broadcast worldwide every day on Twitter and there has been many discussions within the scientific community on how all this information can be used in social sciences, when it is only minimally trackable and disappears within the depth of cyberspace after a while. According to Scientific American, this is about to change. The microblogging platform has declared that it will make all its content – dating back to 2006 – freely available for scientific research. Melinda Wenner Moyer has written a small short piece on the impact the Tweets might have on scientific research. The article implies a positive outcome for Academia – Brian Keegan of Northeastern University, however, believes otherwise. In his commentary on the Scientific American article, he states that only six institutes will receive access, which would mean that over 99,5% of interested researchers will be denied a pass to the huge data set. He proposes other models for open data, which he believes to contain more usability than the model Twitter is proposing.

According to Wired Magazine, the UK was ranked first in two recent studies of worldwide open data policies.The UK government has also pushed for reforms of copyright and as of yesterday the proposals are law. In light of that new revised copyright law, Peter Murray-Rust will release a content-mining software on Wednesday in Vienna. The details are in his statement from the 1st of June.

In an interview with ScienceOpen, Peter Suber argues that senior faculty members should do more to support younger scholars who are interested in publishing research in open access journals.

Stanford is offering a course on Open Knowledge this September. According to the website, the course will be a global conversation on openness that cuts across borders, cultures, disciplines, and professions.

OpenCon2014, The Student and Early Researcher Conference on Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data, will be held November 15 – 17 in Washington, D.C.