Open Access

http://theinformed.org.uk/2014/09/the-cost-of-subscription-publishing/

open-acccess-days-2014Last Week the German Open Acces Days 2014 took place at the University of Applied Science in Cologne. The german speaking Open Access Community came together to discuss about and promote Open Access (OA) as a new norm in scholarship and research communication. It has been a great event with great talks, fabulous presentation and interessting converstions.

This years Open Access Days 2014 were focusing on:

  • Scholarly societies and Open Access
  • Open Access models for monographs and edited volumes
  • Implementation of the Open Access Directive in the EU framework programme Horizon 2020
  • Guidelines and guiding principles for Open Access: Implementation and experiences
  • Creative Commons: Rationale, opportunities, and risks
  • Impact measurement of Open Access
  • Open Research Data: Infrastructures, opportunities, and limits
  • Advisory services on Open Access
  • Qualifying for Open Access at university and at work
  • Open Access and subscription: Open Access options and transformation strategies

Here is a short Twitter-Review about the event: Continue Reading…

http://repositoryranking.org/

http://www.newstatesman.com/science/2014/08/new-scientific-journal-science-advance-condemned-open-access-advocates

http://www.scinoptica.com/pages/topics/open-access-heatmap.php

Our colleague Julien from Mattering Press was recently hosting the interesting session: “Publish like you give a damn, careful experiments in academic” at an STS network meeting, when he stumbled across a surprising question. “Why should young academics write books, if articles are all that counts in evaluations?” Here is his answer. Continue Reading…

Archives often refer to institutional collections (as monuments of modernity) while with recent technological development, individual users can access to and own more and more digital objects, and it seems urgent to address the question of personal archives, that presents to us at the same time an epochal change as well as a political question. This talk address three main questions:

  1. Why is it necessary to talk about personal archives?
  2. How can one define a personal archive and its difference from existing cloud computing services?
  3. What will be the possibility of developing new practices and tools of personal archives?

This workshop will be part facilitated discussion and part exploratory discussion heading towards ideas to further develop.

Where & When? Saturday, August 2, 2014 @ 15:00, Archive Books , Dieffenbachstraße 31, 10967.

Yuk Hui, Ulrike Gollner, Agata Krolikowski, and Minuette Le are researchers, computer scientists, and designers working at the Hybrid Publishing Lab, part of the Centre for Digital Cultures at Leuphana Universität. We also work with the Hybrid Publishing Consortium on issues around open-source infrastructures for academics, small publishers and university publishers.

Suggested Reading

Warwick, Henry, Radical Tactics of the Offline Library, Institute for Network Cultures, Amsterdam Video: https://vimeo.com/95351775

Hui, Yuk, Archivist Manifesto, Centre for Digital Cultures, Leuphana Universität

Mattern, Shannon, Library as Infrastructure Reading room, social service center, maker-space. How far can we stretch the public library?

Please join us this upcoming Saturday – you find more about the workshop here.

http://roarmap.eprints.org

Who hasn’t felt frustrated by not being able to access a piece of research online because of paywalls? The Open Access Button started their work in documenting paywalls late last year and have already tracked and mapped over 8300 paywalls since then. This week their launch coordinator Chealsye Bowley wrote a guest article for BioMedCentral, explaining what it is they do and how Open Access Button has progressed since their early beginnings. Read the full piece here. An introduction to BioMedCentral can be found here.

The International Association of Scientific, Technical & Medical Publishers published a set of open access licenses. According to the site “The licences on this page have been designed to provide easy to use, ready-made terms and conditions which publishers can adopt and/or adapt to the needs of their users.” Andrés Guadamuz was not so sure and took a look himself. Here’s what he found.

According to a headline of ITNEWS for australian business “Academics Get Personal Over Big Data”. The article explains how scholars are reacting to the big data movement and how data de-identification needs to be upgraded to protect academic research.

Continue Reading…

HOAJ-POSTER-header

Starting your own journal is not rocket science. To illustrate this, we boiled down our research on the topic and added some insights from David Solomon, Martin Eve, and other experts. And there it is: a poster that allows you to get an idea of the various aspects of Open Access journal publishing at a glance.

For the poster, we identified seven different issues covering the stages of planning, setting up, running, and sustaining your journal:

  • Scope and Content Strategy
  • People and Workflows
  • Journal Management
  • Design
  • Marketing and Distribution
  • Financing
  • Licenses

Each of these areas is provided with basic information, advice, illustrations, or key questions to ask yourself. The poster is rounded out by some useful key terms and a reference list including further readings, important organizations and links to journal management software and Open Access directories.

Please read, share, and enjoy! We are thankful for critique and feedback, for spreading the word, and passing on this poster to your friends, colleagues, and students. And please let us know when you start your own Open Access journal!

http://www.scinoptica.com/pages/topics/open-access-journals-in-sociology-charging-publication-fees.php

Last weekend was the 20th anniversary of cognitive scientist Steven Harnad publishing what he called “A Subversive Proposal”. This open letter posted on a mailing list called upon all researchers to make their published papers freely available online. “Today the Subversive Proposal is viewed as one of the seminal texts of the open access movement” writes Richard Poynder on his blog Open and Shut. He got to ask Harnard nine questions, which the research answered here.

Continue Reading…

Over the course of the last year we were working hard on establishing an experimental publishing outlet for the Hybrid Publishing Lab. As our first publication is finally completed we are happy to introduce meson press to you. Run by members of the lab the aim of meson press is to publish high quality Open Access monographs. Even though the scholarly book is changing its face in the age of digital media, we strongly believe in the many virtues of its format for academic communication. Some might claim that the book is dead. Nevertheless we are aiming to reinvent the book by developing creative solutions for scholarly publishing in the digital age.

meson press publishes research on digital cultures and networked media. Its publications challenge contemporary theories and advance key debates in the humanities today.

 

Rethinking Gamification
Today our first book will be released: Our friends of the Gamification Lab at the Centre for Digital Cultures of Leuphana University of Lüneburg have put together a formidable volume of articles that seek to rethink gamification. The book offers a candid assessment of the current gamification hype by tracing back its historical roots as well as exploring novel design practices and methods. The contributions to “Rethinking Gamification” (edited by Mathias Fuchs, Sonia Fizek, Paolo Ruffino and Niklas Schrape) furthermore critically discuss the social implications of this phenomenon and present artistic tactics for resistance. Read the full publication here. It’s open access!

Join us on Monday, June 30th, 2014, at 7 p.m. for the official book release of “Rethinking Gamification” at Mond­ba­sis (Lüner­tor­s­traße 20, Lüne­burg, Germany). Let’s talk about Gamification, future books to come, and upcoming topics. And last, but not least, let’s celebrate.

 

http://www.create.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/CREATe-Working-Paper-2014-01.pdf

Five hundred million tweets are broadcast worldwide every day on Twitter and there has been many discussions within the scientific community on how all this information can be used in social sciences, when it is only minimally trackable and disappears within the depth of cyberspace after a while. According to Scientific American, this is about to change. The microblogging platform has declared that it will make all its content – dating back to 2006 – freely available for scientific research. Melinda Wenner Moyer has written a small short piece on the impact the Tweets might have on scientific research. The article implies a positive outcome for Academia – Brian Keegan of Northeastern University, however, believes otherwise. In his commentary on the Scientific American article, he states that only six institutes will receive access, which would mean that over 99,5% of interested researchers will be denied a pass to the huge data set. He proposes other models for open data, which he believes to contain more usability than the model Twitter is proposing.

According to Wired Magazine, the UK was ranked first in two recent studies of worldwide open data policies.The UK government has also pushed for reforms of copyright and as of yesterday the proposals are law. In light of that new revised copyright law, Peter Murray-Rust will release a content-mining software on Wednesday in Vienna. The details are in his statement from the 1st of June.

In an interview with ScienceOpen, Peter Suber argues that senior faculty members should do more to support younger scholars who are interested in publishing research in open access journals.

Stanford is offering a course on Open Knowledge this September. According to the website, the course will be a global conversation on openness that cuts across borders, cultures, disciplines, and professions.

OpenCon2014, The Student and Early Researcher Conference on Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data, will be held November 15 – 17 in Washington, D.C.