Open Access

When talking about Open Access to technologists, developers etc. the focus quickly shifts to repositories as well as the issue of automated metadata exchange. Essentially repositories are huge document stores that allow for the systematic description of documents with metadata. Additionally contemporary repository systems like DSpace, Fedora, Opus etc. usually provide a standardized OAI-PMH interface allowing data aggregators to harvest data from the repository and to include this data into their own catalogues. That’s an important feature which comes at considerable cost with the above mentioned systems. Even though they are Open Source they are designed for huge collections of Open Access publications and are thus rather complex. Installing and maintaining them easily becomes a full time job.

For small and medium publishers in the area of Open Access DSpace and the like are just too big, too powerful, and too complicated. Thus, we searched for a different solution. And we found one. Continue Reading…

Here you find the video recording of the Post-Digital Scholar Conference-Session 5 on “Piracy and Open Access”. On Stage: Gary Hall (Coventry University), Bodo Balasz (University of Amsterdam) and Henry Warwick (Ryerson University in Toronto), moderated by Michael Dieter.

Here you can find all the other recordings and other reviews of the conference.

A while back we published the infographic „How to Start an Open Access Journal“ on this blog. Drawing on existing research on Open Access journals and the experiences we gained in the Hybrid Publishing Lab we originally assembled the poster for a workshop with a group of scholars interested in starting their own Open Access journal. Recently my colleague Andreas Kirchner and I have been conducting another workshop with doctoral and postdoctoral researchers from the International Graduate Centre for the Study of Culture at the Justus-Liebig-University in Giessen on the same topic. We took this occasion as an opportunity to create an “Open Access Journal Canvas” (PDF) which supplements the poster.

Open Access Journal Canvas Continue Reading…

The first issue of the world’s first scientific journal was published on 6 March 1665. Its anniversary gives historians and scientists an opportunity to reflect on the past, present and future of scientific publishing

Read the full text at theguardian.com

http://www.hefce.ac.uk/pubs/rereports/year/2015/monographs/#d.en.99908

http://www.mpdl.mpg.de/en/about-us/news.html

Another predatory publisher has been reported by Scholarly Open Access this week. The journal named Journal of Computer Science and Information Technology has published bogus articles such as Robots No Longer Considered Harmful. If that has not yet caught your attention, the authors I.P. Freely and Oliver Clothesoff should hint at what Scholarly OA has researched: the site is bogus, there is no real institute behind it and scholars should not submit to it. Have a look at the article and the list of the 52 predatory journals in total the fake institute has released here.

The ‘Libraccess’ Proposal has been worked and reworked and is online in its final version now. It specifies the need for a new platform for Open Access and stresses the importance of OA today. Read it in full here.

Mozilla is launching a fellowship program to build capacity for open science. The fellowships will run for 10-months, focusing on three fellows for the first two rounds, and include a mix of computational and data training as well as community engagement. The end goal:  training up the next round of open science trainers in research. Read all about it here.

Should Academic Journals Adopt Non-Profit Publishing Models?The title question of an article appearing on the enago blog is central to many OA debates, as universities and research centers currently pay high rates to access content their own researchers have produced.Don Fullerton, a professor of finance and associate director of the University of Illinois’ Institute of Government and Public Affairs, is of the opinion that Academia should not help publishing houses to generate those large profit margins. Read why here.

The question of academic access to current work is also addressed by Jason Schmitt, who claims academic journals to be “the most profitable obsolete technology in history“. What can be changed? According to him, everything. Read all about it here.

http://www.psmag.com/navigation/books-and-culture/point-academic-books-publishing-writing-literature-96610/

http://blogs.plos.org/absolutely-maybe/open-access-2014-a-year-that-data-cracked-through-secrecy-and-myth/

http://www.snf.ch/de/fokusForschung/newsroom/Seiten/news-141218-pilotprojekt-publikationen.aspx

http://www.citeulike.org/group/13803

http://www.necsus-ejms.org/crowdsourcing-institutional-support-gold-open-access-necsus/

It’s Open Access Week and the Electronic Frontier Foundation are celebrating with daily blogposts about various aspects of open access, as well as ways to get into the movement. Visit this page for daily updates! Also, check out the OA events happening all across the globe here.

The Open Access Button launches with new features. The re-launch was celebrated in London yesterday, and you can view a documentation of the ceremony here.

Open Knowledge is launching a new initiative focusing on the future of open access in the humanities and social sciences. The Future of Scholarship project aims to build a stronger, better connected network of people interested in open access in the humanities and social sciences. It will serve as a central point of reference for leading voices, examples, practical advice and critical debate about the future of humanities and social sciences scholarship on the web. Read the full initiative statement here.

Peter Suber has collected a number of interesting reads for open access week available here. The posts cover introductions to open access, as well as recent practices and strategies.

The Oxford University Press blog has posted an overview of the jungle that is licensing. Get up-to-date info here. They also provided us with the five key moments in open access. Check them out here.

And if all this reading is too much, check out the top tips for your open access week video by the Right to Research Foundation

http://www.openaccessweek.org/events/workshop-why-open-access-matters

http://doi.org/10.2312/allianzoa.007