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Change is upon us and open access is coming. The Economist has published an article revising the big steps open access has taken since the first Budapest agreement in 2001, where the term was coined. While a lot has been done, especially in the last couple of years, there is still a long way to go, especially considering the small number of OA publications in social sciences and humanities.

These areas of research still mostly rely on monographs for shaping and sharing scholarship, shows a recent survey by JISC. Melissa Terras has written an article on her experiences with publishing monographs in the Guardian.

Glyn Moody covers another reason for open access in techdirt. Drawing from a debate on QuestionCopyright.org, the post reasons that copyright gets in the way of scientific debate, especially when the debate needs copyrighted data to prove a point. Read the full argument here.

According to Times Higher Education open access has had little or no impact on the profits of the world’s largest scientific, technology, engineering and mathematics publishers. This information is derived from an investors report released by Bernstein Research and republished by Richard Poynder earlier this week. Read the article by Paul Jump here.

While these profits for publishers seem easily permeable, the costs of subscription publishing is not. Stuart Lawson describes the need for transparency in subscription data and has collected all the caveats about data available right now in this article.

As of today, Internet Archaeology has followed in the footsteps of many others in becoming an open access journal. It is the final step in a process of the ever-hybrid journal becoming more and more accessible. Read about the journey here.

Nature Communications has announced today that from 20th October onwards it will solely accept open access research submissions in a bid to demonstrate how quality research can progress without paywalls. Read the press release here.

The American Physical Society (APS) and The European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) jointly announce a partnership to make all CERN-authored articles published in the APS journal collection to be Open Access. The press release on the APS site states an increase of commitment to open access. However, Hontas Farmer has compiled a rather critical view of the seemingly good news on science 2.0. Read her analysis here.

The Open Access Button has joined with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Creative Commons and the Right to Research Coalition to launch a petition in support of Diego Gomez who currently faces up to eight years in prison for posting research results online for those who would not otherwise have a way to access them. If you want to support Diego Gomez, sign the petition here.

The British Library and the Institute for scientific and technical information (Inist-CNRS) have collaborated to provide a multidisciplinary repository for European grey literature called OpenGrey. It is meant to improve access to documents dating back to 2003. Read the press release here.

“Are we trading quality for affordability?” asks Andrea Hacker in a post on her blog. The article takes a critical look at Open Access Gold and asks, whether format is everything and if editing might be left behind. Read the full text here.

Somebody has to pay the cost of publishing peer-reviewed essays in scientific journals, says the Guardian’s John Abraham. Deciding who that should be is the part where things get tricky. Read Abraham’s guidelines for deciding who should carry the cost of publishing here.

The letter box, by the berlin-based Design Research Lab (DRL), easily transforms analog input into digital data. The ritualized act of posting a letter is used to bridge the gap between the physical with the digital space. This letter box mirrors the DRL-goal that neither prior knowledge nor specific digital devices should be needed in order to take part in the sociopolitical network we are designing in order to enable communities to develop resilient actions.

The letter box transfers a hand-written message to a digital platform so the issue can be spread effectively and publics can form around the discourse possibly emerging around it. You can find more about the Box about the Hybrid Letter Box here.

Gigaom‘s Mathew Ingram has written an article on new business models. Ingram takes a look at The Guardian, to see that what they are selling, is not access: “Like the music industry, the Guardian has realized that the value in media isn’t in selling access to a specific product or unit of content, but in creating a deep relationship with readers and fans who want access”. Read the whole article here.

A new study looks at how engineers and designers from companies like Storify, Zite, and Google News see their work as similar — and different — from traditional journalism. Mike Ananny and Kate Crawford have published the results of their study looking at new information flows within digital technologies. Are algorithms the new editors? Read all about it here.

Andrew Hughes of the Research School of Management at the Australian National University has published an article on what free really means today. Read about the crisis of business models and why, in his opinion, free was never really free here.

Open Access definitions might be varied, however the LSE blog for social sciences has recently posted an article by Glyn Moody, reminding authors that giving up copyright might be a bad idea. What to draw from the software debate and which key areas of division exist in the licensing jungle can be explored here.

The PSFK Labs met up with John Sherry, director of User Experience Design at Intel Corporation, and Brandon Barnett, director of Business Innovation at Intel Labs to discuss the open source movement from a business perspective. Read the full interview here.

The Open Access Publishing in European Networks (OAPEN) and Jisc collection are setting up an OA monograph service. The pilot projects aim is to design and set up a centralised service in cooperation with UK universities to support and encourage the publication of Open Access (OA) peer-reviewed monographs. Read the full project description here.

Paul Vierkand and Maxi Kindling of HU Berlin have created an Infograph displaying the most valuable open access repositories in Germany. Based on 2014 Census of Open Access Repositories in Germany, Austria and Switzerland [1] data that has been categorized for this ranking into General Information, Usability, Value-added Services, Metadata, Interoperability and Community. Check it out here.

Margaret Atwood has been named as the first contributor to the Future Library Project. Every year until 2114, one writer will be invited to contribute a new text to the collection, and in 2114, the trees will be cut down to provide the paper for the texts to be printed – and, finally, read. Until then, all manuscripts will be stored – without any feedback to the author. Read all about the project and its first contributor here.

Graham Steel, open access advocate, talked to the Open Access Button about why he believes that paywalls stifle innovation and progress in science. This interview is the beginning of a series, where the blog highlights the work of the OA community it engages with.

A new project kickstarts today researching what the initiators are calling Generation E – European expats under the age of 40 taking on the EU’s fundamental right of free movement to build a future within Europe, but not in their homeland. The Project is crowdsourcing stories from Italy, Greece, Spain and Portugal specifically, but also other European migrant stories, in an attempt to track supposed openness within European movement. Read about the project here.

And last but definitely not least, here is a very useful list of open access journals with impact factors.

 

Check out the Open Steps event calender! The new site for open knowledge related projects aggregates worldwide resources to inform researchers in the field. You can find many upcoming Open Knowledge events taking place all across the globe. Never miss one again: check it out here.

The Open Access Button is launching a mobile app. This work is being funded by JISC as part of the Summer of Student Innovation initiative, and you can read the first of many blogposts updating on the development here.

As Colleges opened in the US last week, students are faced with a large sum to spend on textbooks for the following semester. Blair Horner, Legislative Director of the New York Public Interest Research Group, has commented on how the lack of open textbooks are holding back the country’s educational potential. Read and listen to the full piece here.

Scholarly Kitchen‘s Kent Anderson interviewed Gordon Nelson, President of the Council of Scientific Society Presidents (CSSP), after he had published an article in the Capitol Hill publication The Hill with the title: “What happens when you take something of value and give it away?”. Read the interview about public access policies, open access and the viability of scientific societies here.

Paul Barrett has written a rational post on implementing OA. While he is a self-declared advocate of OA, he identifies speed bumps and problems that need to be worked on. Read the full piece on his blog.

Who governs science? The guardian’s science section, occams corner, discusses the recent retraction of two papers on stem-cell research. According to the author of the article, Stephen Curry, this event marks the weaknesses of the self-regulatory process of peer review, which needs to be addressed by all scientists. Read the article in full here.

Laura Hazard Owen has covered recent protests of Amazons actions against book publisher bonnier in Germany. According to the article on Gigaom, more than 1100 German, Austrian and Swiss authors have a letter of protest to the company. Amazon has been delaying Bonnier book shipments (as a result of keeping fewer Bonnier titles in stock). Read the report here.

Sampo Viiri of the Finnish Institute in London blogged about Wikimania, the annual event of the Wikimedia movement which took place from the 8-10th of August in London. The event, a festival-congress-hybrid, included over 200 speakers in 8 simultaneous spaces inside the Barbican Centre, with fringe events and hackathons running during the event and preceding it. The full report is available here.

On a blogspot titled “Musings about Librarianship” an article describes how academic libraries might change when open access publishing becomes the norm. The piece predicts a larger change as was the case in the print-to-digital shift and questions whether or not the shift to open access is inevitable. Read in full here.

Jon Tennant has posted an article to the Open Access Button blog with thoughts on for-profit publishers, open access and academic culture. The OA enthusiast calls paywalls the “failure of publishers” to do the one job they were assigned to do. Read his critical piece here.

Proud2Know posted a small piece on 7 institutional benefits to implementing open access. The points were shared this summer on a joint SPARC Europe LIBER workshop in Riga as part of programme management work done for SPARC Europe. Check them out here.

How the Past Defines the Present. Understanding the Path Dependancy of Academic Publishing

This week, there has been a lot of discussion around a recent report released by the Research Information Network, which relates the number of citations to an articles download performance. Paul Jump of Times Higher Education has written a summary of the study, which analyzed over 2000 articles on the hybrid science journal Nature Communications. However, Phil Davis of  The Scholarly Kitchen wonders whether Open Access is a “Cause or Effect” in that calculation.

Another debate has been picked up by The Guardian about whether the UK government should favor “gold” or “green” Open Access policies – the former making access freely available via the journal they are published in, the latter through a freely accessible university repository. Read the article in full here, and a short distinction of gold and green here, where Peter Suber tries to abolish harmful myths of open access publishing.

The EFF has published an article on the importance of the fight for open access, following the persecution of Colombian student Diego Gomez, who – like Aaron Swartz – has taken up the fight against closed knowledge databases and has to fear longterm imprisonment for breaking laws against piracy. Read about the very real political consequences of closed knowledge here.

 

Who hasn’t felt frustrated by not being able to access a piece of research online because of paywalls? The Open Access Button started their work in documenting paywalls late last year and have already tracked and mapped over 8300 paywalls since then. This week their launch coordinator Chealsye Bowley wrote a guest article for BioMedCentral, explaining what it is they do and how Open Access Button has progressed since their early beginnings. Read the full piece here. An introduction to BioMedCentral can be found here.

The International Association of Scientific, Technical & Medical Publishers published a set of open access licenses. According to the site “The licences on this page have been designed to provide easy to use, ready-made terms and conditions which publishers can adopt and/or adapt to the needs of their users.” Andrés Guadamuz was not so sure and took a look himself. Here’s what he found.

According to a headline of ITNEWS for australian business “Academics Get Personal Over Big Data”. The article explains how scholars are reacting to the big data movement and how data de-identification needs to be upgraded to protect academic research.

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Last weekend was the 20th anniversary of cognitive scientist Steven Harnad publishing what he called “A Subversive Proposal”. This open letter posted on a mailing list called upon all researchers to make their published papers freely available online. “Today the Subversive Proposal is viewed as one of the seminal texts of the open access movement” writes Richard Poynder on his blog Open and Shut. He got to ask Harnard nine questions, which the research answered here.

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This week’s list of links starts with an entry posted on the Many Possibilities blog. The blog is maintained by Steve Song, Founder of Village Telco, a social enterprise that builds low-cost WiFi mesh VoIP technologies to deliver affordable voice and Internet in underserviced areas. His newest entry, titled “The Morality of Openness”, deals with the language of openness and uses three contemporary books to illustrate, how “Openness” is possibly not the right word to frame the movement that everyone seems to be passionately discussing.

In an attempt to cut through the relentless TED Talk-like optimism of ed tech marketing, this year at the HASTAC conference in Peru Sava Saheli Singh and Tim Maughan presented a series of fictional case studies on the future of technology in education. Within their presentation, they point to the fact that technologies are here, and available, however, they are not evenly distributed. View the case studies on medium.com.

On the New York Review of Books, Steve Coll applies himself to reviewing Brad Stone’s book “The Everything Store. Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon” (ironically, the link on the nybooks site, just like here, leads to amazon.com). The book tells the story of Amazon founder Jeff Bezos and Coll, with Stone, takes a critical look on the omnipotence that is Amazon. Read the full review here.

Endre Dányi and Joe Deville have recently taken part in a workshop on Experiments in Knowledge Production. The event brought together a number of OA publishing initiatives to examine the challenges of OA publishing and how these are faced in practice. On the Blog of the Centre for the Study of Invention & Social Process in Goldsmith, they have published their reflections on the workshop.

The Swiss National Science Foundation has interviewed the historian Monica Dommann on copyright logics and her new book on the history of copyright. Read what she has to say about debates on copyright and what that has to do with freedom and equality here.

The Guardian is doing a round of Self-Publishing Q&As today. Join in between 1pm and 2.30pm and ask all you ever wanted to know about self-publishing. The panelists include Daniel Cooke of New Generation Publishing, Craig Pennington – editor-in-chief of the independent music magazine Bido Lito!, and several others.

Also in The Guardian, Ian Sample, Science editor, explains how secrecy over academic journal publishing contracts can veil the fact that many institutions are paying too much for journals.The article is just another in the last couple of months that criticize Elsevier’s paywalls.

The Indian non-profit Pratham Books, which publishes children’s books in local languages, has posted an article on self-publishing as an Indian tradition. In the article, Mahan Hazarika explains the benefits self-publishing has specifically for India, and how India measures up with other countries when it comes to publishing strategies.

HASTAC has extended an invite to participate in the Making Learning Connected MOOC. Sign ups are now open for the second Summer Learning Party, where participants will be encouraged to “hack thy writing”.

In a world where an ever increasing amount of data is generated and collected, those publishing the data must pay greater attention to putting the data into context, to increase its usability and impact – claims Alicia Asin, the co-founder and CEO of hardware provider Libelium, as expressed in a recent blog post on Gigaom. Asin explains “while it is true that we have access to more information than ever before, we are not experts on every subject. Thus, it is very difficult to digest it. My concern is that over-information is the new way of hiding information. If we demand context and facts instead of dumb numbers, the biggest legacy of the internet of things will be a world that is more transparent and democratic.“

Kevin Shively has recently reviewed LinkedIn’s publishing options and was surprised at how well the post performed. Read his full article on how data can help plan your posts on Simplymeasured.

Five hundred million tweets are broadcast worldwide every day on Twitter and there has been many discussions within the scientific community on how all this information can be used in social sciences, when it is only minimally trackable and disappears within the depth of cyberspace after a while. According to Scientific American, this is about to change. The microblogging platform has declared that it will make all its content – dating back to 2006 – freely available for scientific research. Melinda Wenner Moyer has written a small short piece on the impact the Tweets might have on scientific research. The article implies a positive outcome for Academia – Brian Keegan of Northeastern University, however, believes otherwise. In his commentary on the Scientific American article, he states that only six institutes will receive access, which would mean that over 99,5% of interested researchers will be denied a pass to the huge data set. He proposes other models for open data, which he believes to contain more usability than the model Twitter is proposing.

According to Wired Magazine, the UK was ranked first in two recent studies of worldwide open data policies.The UK government has also pushed for reforms of copyright and as of yesterday the proposals are law. In light of that new revised copyright law, Peter Murray-Rust will release a content-mining software on Wednesday in Vienna. The details are in his statement from the 1st of June.

In an interview with ScienceOpen, Peter Suber argues that senior faculty members should do more to support younger scholars who are interested in publishing research in open access journals.

Stanford is offering a course on Open Knowledge this September. According to the website, the course will be a global conversation on openness that cuts across borders, cultures, disciplines, and professions.

OpenCon2014, The Student and Early Researcher Conference on Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data, will be held November 15 – 17 in Washington, D.C.