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What can publishing mean for theory today? Jussi Parikka asked us to explain our new project meson press

Over the course of the last year we were working hard on establishing an experimental publishing outlet for the Hybrid Publishing Lab. As our first publication is finally completed we are happy to introduce meson press to you. Run by members of the lab the aim of meson press is to publish high quality Open Access monographs. Even though the scholarly book is changing its face in the age of digital media, we strongly believe in the many virtues of its format for academic communication. Some might claim that the book is dead. Nevertheless we are aiming to reinvent the book by developing creative solutions for scholarly publishing in the digital age.

meson press publishes research on digital cultures and networked media. Its publications challenge contemporary theories and advance key debates in the humanities today.

 

Rethinking Gamification
Today our first book will be released: Our friends of the Gamification Lab at the Centre for Digital Cultures of Leuphana University of Lüneburg have put together a formidable volume of articles that seek to rethink gamification. The book offers a candid assessment of the current gamification hype by tracing back its historical roots as well as exploring novel design practices and methods. The contributions to “Rethinking Gamification” (edited by Mathias Fuchs, Sonia Fizek, Paolo Ruffino and Niklas Schrape) furthermore critically discuss the social implications of this phenomenon and present artistic tactics for resistance. Read the full publication here. It’s open access!

Join us on Monday, June 30th, 2014, at 7 p.m. for the official book release of “Rethinking Gamification” at Mond­ba­sis (Lüner­tor­s­traße 20, Lüne­burg, Germany). Let’s talk about Gamification, future books to come, and upcoming topics. And last, but not least, let’s celebrate.

 

This week’s list of links starts with an entry posted on the Many Possibilities blog. The blog is maintained by Steve Song, Founder of Village Telco, a social enterprise that builds low-cost WiFi mesh VoIP technologies to deliver affordable voice and Internet in underserviced areas. His newest entry, titled “The Morality of Openness”, deals with the language of openness and uses three contemporary books to illustrate, how “Openness” is possibly not the right word to frame the movement that everyone seems to be passionately discussing.

In an attempt to cut through the relentless TED Talk-like optimism of ed tech marketing, this year at the HASTAC conference in Peru Sava Saheli Singh and Tim Maughan presented a series of fictional case studies on the future of technology in education. Within their presentation, they point to the fact that technologies are here, and available, however, they are not evenly distributed. View the case studies on medium.com.

On the New York Review of Books, Steve Coll applies himself to reviewing Brad Stone’s book “The Everything Store. Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon” (ironically, the link on the nybooks site, just like here, leads to amazon.com). The book tells the story of Amazon founder Jeff Bezos and Coll, with Stone, takes a critical look on the omnipotence that is Amazon. Read the full review here.

Endre Dányi and Joe Deville have recently taken part in a workshop on Experiments in Knowledge Production. The event brought together a number of OA publishing initiatives to examine the challenges of OA publishing and how these are faced in practice. On the Blog of the Centre for the Study of Invention & Social Process in Goldsmith, they have published their reflections on the workshop.

The Swiss National Science Foundation has interviewed the historian Monica Dommann on copyright logics and her new book on the history of copyright. Read what she has to say about debates on copyright and what that has to do with freedom and equality here.

Taylor & Francis apologises over censorship incident (without saying ‘sorry’ or ‘censorship’)

Scanning entire books falls under fair use policy according to a recent ruling

Picture by Mutant669 published under CC-BY-SA

Picture by Mutant669 licensed under Creative Commons (CC BY-SA)

You may remember the debates that were sparked by a piece entitled ‚What are we to do with feral publishers?’ in the UK. This debate has now continued with a further position piece by the Leicester academics David Harvie, Geoff Lightfoot, Simon Lilley and Kenneth Weir written for the journal Prometheus entitled ‘Publishers, be damned! From price gouging to the open road’. The debate, consisting of the proposition piece and responses, including one written by myself, Steffen Böhm and Chris Land, is now published and available in open access. However, its story is rather remarkable, as is the outcome. Continue Reading…

Christof Schöch of SocialScienceSpace looks at five collaborative writing tools for academics and how they fit the needs of the modern researcher.

The reviewed tools range from the “lowest common denominator” Google Drive to FidusWriter, a tool loaded with features for academics.

You can read the full review here.

What are some of the tools you use for your collaborative writing projects? Share your thoughts and links in the comments.

networkWhen I start thinking about DML (digital media and learning) and other such “networks” that I am plugged into, I often get a little confused about what to call them. Are we an ensemble of actors? A cluster of friends? A conference of scholars? A committee of decision makers? An array of perspectives? A group of associates? A play-list of voices? I do not pose these questions rhetorically, though I do enjoy rhetoric. I want to look at this inability to name collectives and the confusions and ambiguity it produces as central to our conversations around digital thinking. In particular, I want to look at the notion of the network. Because, I am sure, that if we were to go for the most neutralised digital term to characterise this collection that we all weave in and out of, it would have to be the network. We are a network. Continue Reading…

future_of_monographic_books_bunz_open_accessThe following open access article in Insights: the UKSG journal, written by Dr. Mercedes Bunz, Director of the Hybrid Publishing Lab at the Centre for Digital Cultures (Leuphana University), evaluates the current state of academic book publishing based on the findings of the Hybrid Publishing Lab’s business model research. Continue Reading…

Here are our favorite tweets from the second Day of the Science 2.0 Conference – make sure you don’t miss our #sci20conf-Review of the first conference day and our outtakes on the bottom of this post. Continue Reading…

More expensive than science allows. University of Konstanz cancels license negotiations with scientific publisher Elsevier

sci20conf_twitterBefore I go into the Twitter Review of the first international Science 2.0 Conference, I’d like to personally thank everyone that came out to support the Idea behind Science 2.0 during this event. So far the Science 2.0 Conference was certainly not my first conference this year, but it was definitely one of my favorite. I have also to mention the great PhD Spring School which was held just before the conference with good presentations and really inspiring discussions.

But lets start with our favorite pickings of the first Day – and don’t miss the outtakes on the bottom of this post:


Continue Reading…

Classic books scanned and available freely to read online via the U.S. Library of Congress

Your chance to name the problems and rate the principles of academic/scientific publishing: the “Online-Konsultation Publikationssystem” by the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities. Too bad that it’s only available in German!

Publishers withdraw more than 120 gibberish papers