Author: Sara Morais

Details for OpenCon2015 have been announced. Under the title Empowering the Next Generation to Advance Open Access, Open Education and Open Data, the congress will take place in on November 14-16 in Brussels, Belgium and bring together students and early career academic professionals from across the world to learn about the issues, develop critical skills, and return home ready to catalyze action toward a more open system for sharing the world’s information — from scholarly and scientific research, to educational materials, to digital data. More details here.

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CERN and Elsevier have announced another Open Access agreement. Thanks to this agreement, CERN results in fields such as nuclear physics, instrumentation, astroparticle physics and scientific computing will appear as Open Access articles, with copyright retained by CERN and its authors, and reuse determined by Creative Commons CC-BY licenses. This allows CERN to progress further towards its stated target of 100% ‘gold’ Open Access for all of its physics results as of 2015. Read the press statement in full here.

“As more and more devices are connected, there are two futures when it comes to privacy. Which one will we pick?” Danny Bradbury contemplates on the privacy issues and pervasiveness of the Internet of Things and wonders: Is personal data going to be the next natural resource, mined like oil? Read the full article on The Guardian.

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The ‘publish or perish’ culture within science skews the research literature towards positive results. But negative findings matter too and new open access publications are helping researchers to give a fuller account of themselves. Stephen Curry writes about the importance of negative findings here.

In February 2015, computer scientist Vint Cerf, known widely for developing the TCP/IP internet protocol standard, gave a lecture at Carnegie Mellon University’s Silicon Valley branch campus in which he spoke of a coming “digital dark age.” The New Inquiry published an article questioning this concept and how to confront the arising problems: How do we talk about the politics of cultural records? If we cannot preserve everything, who defines what is worth saving? read all here.

Although the terminology of Big Data has so far gained little traction in economics, the availability of unprecedentedly rich datasets and the need for new approaches – both epistemological and computational – to deal with them is an emerging issue for the discipline. New research findings on Big Data and Society shed light on questions beyond economics, how Big Data is improving or changing economic models, and the kinds of collaborations arising around Big Data between economists and other disciplines. Read on here.

The big data story is certainly a boon to business. But big data can also play a key role in helping enhance the personal lives of a wide swath of this planet’s humanity. In essence, big data has the capability to help many people around the world work toward alleviating income inequality, as examples of Big Data Strategies for Developing Nations show here.

 

Since December 2014 there is  a new OA joural on MEDIUM: eLife. They had then already published over 700 Research Articles on a broad range of subjects in the life and biomedical sciences—including genetics, neuroscience, stem cells, infectious diseases and ecology. eLife is an open-access journal, so all of these articles are freely available to readers around the world. However, most Research Articles are written for fellow specialists. Therefore, in order to bring the latest research to a wider audience, all eLife articles include a short plain-language summary called an eLife Digest. Check out the new features here.

Last weekend the arts and media festival-congress hybrid that is transmediale took place under the ominous motto of “capture all”. The aftermaths of the Snowden revelations still kept the community with their breaths held waiting for the answer to the one big question. What do we do with our data. In light of this conundrum, Jussi Parikka had answered three questions on media criticality posed by the Critical Media Lab in Basel.

After more than a decade of debate and a record-setting proceeding that attracted nearly 4 million public comments, the time to settle the Net Neutrality question has arrived. Tom Wheeler has outlined the new Open Internet proposal in an op-ed posted on WIRED.

Big Data is still in its early stages of life; to get to the next stage, its integration with core enterprise technologies needs to get better. Chief among the enterprise environments with which Big Data must integrate is the developer ecosystem. Gigaom has presented a panel on why Big Data matters today.

“We are moving towards changes in how ethics has to be perceived: away from individual decisions with specific and knowable outcomes, towards actions by many unaware that they may have taken actions with unintended consequences for anyone”, says Andrej Zwitter in new research on Big Data ethics. Zwitter has published his work OA on the Sage Journal Big Data & Society.

Another predatory publisher has been reported by Scholarly Open Access this week. The journal named Journal of Computer Science and Information Technology has published bogus articles such as Robots No Longer Considered Harmful. If that has not yet caught your attention, the authors I.P. Freely and Oliver Clothesoff should hint at what Scholarly OA has researched: the site is bogus, there is no real institute behind it and scholars should not submit to it. Have a look at the article and the list of the 52 predatory journals in total the fake institute has released here.

The ‘Libraccess’ Proposal has been worked and reworked and is online in its final version now. It specifies the need for a new platform for Open Access and stresses the importance of OA today. Read it in full here.

Mozilla is launching a fellowship program to build capacity for open science. The fellowships will run for 10-months, focusing on three fellows for the first two rounds, and include a mix of computational and data training as well as community engagement. The end goal:  training up the next round of open science trainers in research. Read all about it here.

Should Academic Journals Adopt Non-Profit Publishing Models?The title question of an article appearing on the enago blog is central to many OA debates, as universities and research centers currently pay high rates to access content their own researchers have produced.Don Fullerton, a professor of finance and associate director of the University of Illinois’ Institute of Government and Public Affairs, is of the opinion that Academia should not help publishing houses to generate those large profit margins. Read why here.

The question of academic access to current work is also addressed by Jason Schmitt, who claims academic journals to be “the most profitable obsolete technology in history“. What can be changed? According to him, everything. Read all about it here.

It’s a new year and looking back at 2014 there were a lot of becomings, happenings and ‘THE THING’s around. The event of the CCC in Hamburg shows how cybersecurity issues, copyright and diy computing are intertwining with academia, research and right to knowledge.

One of the things that was totally IT, was ‘ello. Nathan Jurgenson of the Society Pages takes a look at the anti-Facebook boom and how much people yearned to get away from the Network giant. The author ignites a discussion on social media spaces we need -read about it here and don’t overlook the comment section.

We also saw 2014 to be the year of the rise of the algorithm. Motherboard’s Michael Byrne looks at the 2015 problems our 2014 algorithms might be able to fix. Read the article here.

In the meantime, James Miller of eUnter.net speaks to Nico Sell, the founder of the secure messaging app Wickr on privacy, why she always wears dark glasses and how girls make great hackers. Read the full interview here.

Speaking of ‘ello, starting a social media company is hard. Or as Elizabeth Spiers says it, “everybody loves the fantasy that you can start with absolutely nothing and make a successful media company”. But when it comes down to it, here are five mistakes you should try to avoid when starting a media business.

Rick Falkvinge of TorrentFreak is the founder of the first Pirate Party in Sweden. Going into its tenth year on January first, he takes a look at the development of copyright law within that time and comes to the conclusion that things might not be so bad.

 

 

Can Open Access save the scholarly monograph? Scholarly monographs, long the gold standard for scholars in the humanities and social sciences, have been in a downward spiral for some time. Might Knowledge Unlatched, under the direction of Manchester University Press CEO Frances Pinter, finally offer hope for a turnaround? Read Michael Kelley’s report on Frances Pinter’s OA initiative here.

After Scholarly Kitchen published an article on new confusion arising with the CC-BY license standards, a discussion arose on the usage of CC-BY and corporate recycling of data. Read the full post plus comments here.

PLOS has done research on the widespread reluctance to share research data with scientific communities. The hypotheses that authors fear reanalysis may expose errors in their work or may produce conclusions that contradict their own. Read about their findings here.

The third OA Tools Meeting by the Open Access Toolset Alliance happened recently. The minutes of the meeting have been made available here.

Recent moves by established journals to make research papers freely available signpost the direction of travel in academic publishing. The Guardian has published an article on research releases in digital times. Read the full post here.

The collective papers of Albert Einstein have been made open access. Where? Here!

The EFF wraps up a successful Open Access Week 2014. During the week, the EFF had posted new insights on open access every day. See all posts, as well as a recap on what happened, in posts, pictures and parties here.

According to phys.org, younger researchers are more willing to embrace open access. During Open Access Week, around 8000 researchers responded to the 2014 Taylor & Francis Open Access Survey, giving their views on everything from the benefits of open access to licence preferences, peer review to the future of academic publishing. Read a detailed summary of the survey here.

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It’s Open Access Week and the Electronic Frontier Foundation are celebrating with daily blogposts about various aspects of open access, as well as ways to get into the movement. Visit this page for daily updates! Also, check out the OA events happening all across the globe here.

The Open Access Button launches with new features. The re-launch was celebrated in London yesterday, and you can view a documentation of the ceremony here.

Open Knowledge is launching a new initiative focusing on the future of open access in the humanities and social sciences. The Future of Scholarship project aims to build a stronger, better connected network of people interested in open access in the humanities and social sciences. It will serve as a central point of reference for leading voices, examples, practical advice and critical debate about the future of humanities and social sciences scholarship on the web. Read the full initiative statement here.

Peter Suber has collected a number of interesting reads for open access week available here. The posts cover introductions to open access, as well as recent practices and strategies.

The Oxford University Press blog has posted an overview of the jungle that is licensing. Get up-to-date info here. They also provided us with the five key moments in open access. Check them out here.

And if all this reading is too much, check out the top tips for your open access week video by the Right to Research Foundation

For whoever wants to get a head-start on Open Access Week, the what, why and how of open access is explained here, where you will find a full summary and history of open access, its different license options and infrastructure.

By the way: The Hybrid Publishing Lab is co-organising an event “Why Open Access matters” for the upcoming Open Access Week 2014 at the Leuphana University. You find more Infromation here (in german only).

Wall Street analysts say open access has failed due to lack of focus. The LSE blog says this analysis might be what makes open access succeed. Curt Rice suggests ways in which universities and publishing need to take leadership to make open access strategies successful. Read in full here.

Thinking about buying a crowdfunded 3D printer? Not so fast, says a recent article on Gigaom. Signe Brewster and Biz Carston added up the details on 67 successfully crowdfunded 3D printers via kickstarter and indiegogo. Look at numbers and flowcharts here.

Apple was recently granted a patent for a flexible display that can be used as a self-updating digital newspaper. While this sounds like we might soon all be reading the iNews, an article in the business insider reminds us that Apple has lots of patents, just because. Look at the article and details to Apple’s patent filing here.

Harvard University now wants their scientific publications to be all open access. According to the Guardian Harvard University encourages faculty members to make their research freely available through open access journals, rather than using those with paywalls. The reason for this is that the university itself does not seem to be able to keep up with the rising costs of subscription journals. Read the full article here.

Telegraph Media Group has restructured its editorial operations, focusing on digital content, which in future will constitute the backbone of all printed editions of the daily telegraph. This simplifies editorial processes and goes into and beyond concepts of “digital first”. Read how this changes the work of journalists here.

Change is upon us and open access is coming. The Economist has published an article revising the big steps open access has taken since the first Budapest agreement in 2001, where the term was coined. While a lot has been done, especially in the last couple of years, there is still a long way to go, especially considering the small number of OA publications in social sciences and humanities.

These areas of research still mostly rely on monographs for shaping and sharing scholarship, shows a recent survey by JISC. Melissa Terras has written an article on her experiences with publishing monographs in the Guardian.

Glyn Moody covers another reason for open access in techdirt. Drawing from a debate on QuestionCopyright.org, the post reasons that copyright gets in the way of scientific debate, especially when the debate needs copyrighted data to prove a point. Read the full argument here.

According to Times Higher Education open access has had little or no impact on the profits of the world’s largest scientific, technology, engineering and mathematics publishers. This information is derived from an investors report released by Bernstein Research and republished by Richard Poynder earlier this week. Read the article by Paul Jump here.

While these profits for publishers seem easily permeable, the costs of subscription publishing is not. Stuart Lawson describes the need for transparency in subscription data and has collected all the caveats about data available right now in this article.

As of today, Internet Archaeology has followed in the footsteps of many others in becoming an open access journal. It is the final step in a process of the ever-hybrid journal becoming more and more accessible. Read about the journey here.

Nature Communications has announced today that from 20th October onwards it will solely accept open access research submissions in a bid to demonstrate how quality research can progress without paywalls. Read the press release here.

The American Physical Society (APS) and The European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) jointly announce a partnership to make all CERN-authored articles published in the APS journal collection to be Open Access. The press release on the APS site states an increase of commitment to open access. However, Hontas Farmer has compiled a rather critical view of the seemingly good news on science 2.0. Read her analysis here.

The Open Access Button has joined with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Creative Commons and the Right to Research Coalition to launch a petition in support of Diego Gomez who currently faces up to eight years in prison for posting research results online for those who would not otherwise have a way to access them. If you want to support Diego Gomez, sign the petition here.

The British Library and the Institute for scientific and technical information (Inist-CNRS) have collaborated to provide a multidisciplinary repository for European grey literature called OpenGrey. It is meant to improve access to documents dating back to 2003. Read the press release here.

“Are we trading quality for affordability?” asks Andrea Hacker in a post on her blog. The article takes a critical look at Open Access Gold and asks, whether format is everything and if editing might be left behind. Read the full text here.

Somebody has to pay the cost of publishing peer-reviewed essays in scientific journals, says the Guardian’s John Abraham. Deciding who that should be is the part where things get tricky. Read Abraham’s guidelines for deciding who should carry the cost of publishing here.

Gigaom‘s Mathew Ingram has written an article on new business models. Ingram takes a look at The Guardian, to see that what they are selling, is not access: “Like the music industry, the Guardian has realized that the value in media isn’t in selling access to a specific product or unit of content, but in creating a deep relationship with readers and fans who want access”. Read the whole article here.

A new study looks at how engineers and designers from companies like Storify, Zite, and Google News see their work as similar — and different — from traditional journalism. Mike Ananny and Kate Crawford have published the results of their study looking at new information flows within digital technologies. Are algorithms the new editors? Read all about it here.

Andrew Hughes of the Research School of Management at the Australian National University has published an article on what free really means today. Read about the crisis of business models and why, in his opinion, free was never really free here.

Open Access definitions might be varied, however the LSE blog for social sciences has recently posted an article by Glyn Moody, reminding authors that giving up copyright might be a bad idea. What to draw from the software debate and which key areas of division exist in the licensing jungle can be explored here.

The PSFK Labs met up with John Sherry, director of User Experience Design at Intel Corporation, and Brandon Barnett, director of Business Innovation at Intel Labs to discuss the open source movement from a business perspective. Read the full interview here.

The Open Access Publishing in European Networks (OAPEN) and Jisc collection are setting up an OA monograph service. The pilot projects aim is to design and set up a centralised service in cooperation with UK universities to support and encourage the publication of Open Access (OA) peer-reviewed monographs. Read the full project description here.

Paul Vierkand and Maxi Kindling of HU Berlin have created an Infograph displaying the most valuable open access repositories in Germany. Based on 2014 Census of Open Access Repositories in Germany, Austria and Switzerland [1] data that has been categorized for this ranking into General Information, Usability, Value-added Services, Metadata, Interoperability and Community. Check it out here.

Margaret Atwood has been named as the first contributor to the Future Library Project. Every year until 2114, one writer will be invited to contribute a new text to the collection, and in 2114, the trees will be cut down to provide the paper for the texts to be printed – and, finally, read. Until then, all manuscripts will be stored – without any feedback to the author. Read all about the project and its first contributor here.

Graham Steel, open access advocate, talked to the Open Access Button about why he believes that paywalls stifle innovation and progress in science. This interview is the beginning of a series, where the blog highlights the work of the OA community it engages with.

A new project kickstarts today researching what the initiators are calling Generation E – European expats under the age of 40 taking on the EU’s fundamental right of free movement to build a future within Europe, but not in their homeland. The Project is crowdsourcing stories from Italy, Greece, Spain and Portugal specifically, but also other European migrant stories, in an attempt to track supposed openness within European movement. Read about the project here.

And last but definitely not least, here is a very useful list of open access journals with impact factors.

 

Check out the Open Steps event calender! The new site for open knowledge related projects aggregates worldwide resources to inform researchers in the field. You can find many upcoming Open Knowledge events taking place all across the globe. Never miss one again: check it out here.

The Open Access Button is launching a mobile app. This work is being funded by JISC as part of the Summer of Student Innovation initiative, and you can read the first of many blogposts updating on the development here.

As Colleges opened in the US last week, students are faced with a large sum to spend on textbooks for the following semester. Blair Horner, Legislative Director of the New York Public Interest Research Group, has commented on how the lack of open textbooks are holding back the country’s educational potential. Read and listen to the full piece here.

Scholarly Kitchen‘s Kent Anderson interviewed Gordon Nelson, President of the Council of Scientific Society Presidents (CSSP), after he had published an article in the Capitol Hill publication The Hill with the title: “What happens when you take something of value and give it away?”. Read the interview about public access policies, open access and the viability of scientific societies here.

Paul Barrett has written a rational post on implementing OA. While he is a self-declared advocate of OA, he identifies speed bumps and problems that need to be worked on. Read the full piece on his blog.