Author: Christian Heise

Research Associate at the Hybrid Publishing Lab and Member of Board of the Open Knowledge Foundation Germany, currently working on his Ph.D thesis about Open Science. More about me...

Here you find the recording of the 8th Session of the Post-Digital Scholar Conference on “Books as Data” with : Bernhard Rieder (University of Amsterdam), Adriaan van der Weel (University of Leiden) and Julianne Nyhan (University College London), moderated by Michael Dieter.

Here you can find all the other recordings and other reviews of the conference.

Did you miss the Post-Digital Scholar Conference? No problem, here is the recording of the Session 7 on “Post-Digital Publishing”. On Stage: Jeroen Sondervan (Amsterdam University Press), Tariq Goddard (Zero Books), Felix Evert (De Gruyter) and Jonathan Landgrebe (Suhrkamp Verlag), Moderation by Mercedes Bunz.

Here you can find all the other recordings and other reviews of the conference.

Today we publish the video recording of the 6th session of the Post-Digital Scholar Conference in Lüneburg. The 6th Session had the title “Scholarly Publishing in the Eye of an Entrepreneur”, with Janneke Adema (Coventry University), Nathaniel Tkacz (University of Warwick), Armin Beverungen (Leuphana University), Martin Haspelmath (Max Planck Institute) and Helge Peters (Oxford University), moderated by Andreas Krichner (Hybrid Publishing Lab).

Here you can find all the other recordings and other reviews of the conference.

The Social Web exerts increasing influence on the daily routines of researchers and offers new opportunities for networking and interdisciplinary collaboration. This includes free access to and exchange of findings and research results. To achieve this opening up of science, obstacles must be removed and barriers overcome. This is reflected in the motto of the Barcamp Science 2.0 “Opening up Science, crossing borders”. The Barcamp will take place on 24 March 2015 in Hamburg, on the eve of this year’s Science 2.0 Conference (25 to 26 March).

Find more Information here.

Today we publish the video recording of the forth session of the Post-Digital Scholar Conference in Lüneburg. The forth Session had the title “Scholarly Publishing in the Eye of an Entrepreneur”, with Kathryn Eccles (Oxford Internet Institute), René König (Karlsruhe Institue of Technology), Jonas Liepmann (iversity) and Cornelius Puschmann (Humboldt University Berlin):

Here you can find all the other recordings and other reviews of the conference.

The first issue of the world’s first scientific journal was published on 6 March 1665. Its anniversary gives historians and scientists an opportunity to reflect on the past, present and future of scientific publishing

Read the full text at theguardian.com

Last year the Hybrid Publishing Lab organized the Post-Digital Scholar Conference in Lüneburg.

For three days, publishers, researchers, programmers, designers, artists, and entrepreneurs discussed how research and publishing in the humanities have changed over the past decade. The conference explored new tools for gathering knowledge, examine platforms for multimedia publishing, or collaborative writing experiments.

In the upcoming weeks, we will release two video of the conference sessions per week. Here you find the Video of the second Session “Let Us In! The Central Role of the Library” with Lambert Heller (Leibniz University Hannover), Thomas Stäcker (Herzog August Library Wolfenbüttel), Soeren Pold (Universität of Aarhus), Corinna Haas (ICI Berlin Institute for Cultural Inquiry) und Christian Heise:

Last year the Hybrid Publishing Lab organized the Post-Digital Scholar Conference in Lüneburg. For three days, publishers, researchers, programmers, designers, artists, and entrepreneurs discussed how research and publishing in the humanities have changed over the past decade. The conference explored new tools for gathering knowledge, examine platforms for multimedia publishing, or collaborative writing experiments.

In the upcoming weeks, we will release two video of the conference sessions per week. Here you find the Video of the Introduction and the first Session on the “Future of Writing” with Clare Birchall (Kings College), David M. Berry (University of Sussex), Geert Lovink (Institute of Network Cultures Amsterdam) and Mercedes Bunz:

The Digital Humanities have established their place in the humanities and are inspiring new research questions, approaches and discoveries. The following film introduces innovative projects from differend Humanities disciplines, shows the role if infrastructure institutions such as libraries and provides an overview of academic options and the active community.

Open Access Ambassadors Conference- Afterthought

Open Access 2014: A Year that Data Cracked Through Secrecy and Myth


Photos are shot by Hannes Harnack and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) license.

The Team of the Hybrid Publishing Lab at the Post-Digital Scholar Conference 2014

The Team of the Hybrid Publishing Lab at the Post-Digital Scholar Conference 2014

The con­fe­rence “Post-Di­gi­tal Scho­lar: Pu­blis­hing bet­ween Open Ac­cess, Pi­ra­cy and the Pu­blic Sphe­re” tur­ned in a good score­card with nine ses­si­ons, three work­shops, about 130 par­ti­ci­pants and 950 tweets. Or­ga­ni­zed by the Hy­brid Pu­blis­hing Lab, the con­fe­rence took place in Lüne­burg from 12 to 14 No­vem­ber 2014. In this re­port you can read more about the to­pics dis­cus­sed by in­ter­na­tio­nal scho­lars, pu­blis­hers, re­se­ar­chers, pro­gramm­ers, ar­tists and busi­ness ma­na­gers. Pu­blis­hers, en­tre­pre­neurs, li­bra­ri­ans, ar­tists and scho­lars came to­ge­ther in the Lüne­burg Mu­sic School from 12 to 14 No­vem­ber 2014 to dis­cuss the chal­len­ges and chan­ces for scho­lar­ly com­mu­ni­ca­ti­on in the di­gi­tal age. How are the wri­ting of aca­de­mic texts and the book for­mat chan­ging? What role should li­bra­ries play in the fu­ture? How can the de­mand for open ac­cess to scho­lar­ship be sa­tis­fied in an eco­no­mi­cal and aca­de­mi­cal­ly re­s­pon­si­ble way? And how can tra­di­tio­nal aca­de­mic pu­blis­hing hou­ses keep pace with the­se de­ve­lop­ments? The­se ques­ti­ons and others were in­ten­se­ly dis­cus­sed and so­me­ti­mes hot­ly de­ba­ted in nine pa­nels and three work­shops at the con­fe­rence “The Post-Di­gi­tal Scho­lar: Pu­blis­hing bet­ween Open Ac­cess, Pi­ra­cy, and the Pu­blic Sphe­re”. Continue Reading…

Academic publishing can free itself from its outdated path dependence by looking to alternative review mechanisms.

The last day of the Post-Digital Scholar Conference is over. Thanks to everyone who joined our #pdsc14 conference. It was thought provoking and inspiring conference and we had a great time! If you missed the conference, you can review the event in our third part of favorite #pdsc14 pickings – and don’t miss the outtakes on the bottom of this post or the other reviews: Continue Reading…