PDS_Poster_30714We would like to finally announce and invite you to a conference debating the future of publishing in the humanities from the 12.11. – 14.11.2014 in Lüneburg, Germany.

At the “Post-Digital Scholar Conference: Open Access, Piracy and Public Spheres“ national and international experts will share their research and findings. Publishers and academics, authors and designers, programmers and artists, hackers and entrepreneurs will discuss new developments in publishing and communication. The conference is organized by the Hybrid Publishing Lab of the Centre for Digital Culture at Leuphana University.

Participation is free of charge. Please register here. Our Website postdigitalscholar.org keeps you updated. You can donwload the conference poster here.

Archives often refer to institutional collections (as monuments of modernity) while with recent technological development, individual users can access to and own more and more digital objects, and it seems urgent to address the question of personal archives, that presents to us at the same time an epochal change as well as a political question. This talk address three main questions:

  1. Why is it necessary to talk about personal archives?
  2. How can one define a personal archive and its difference from existing cloud computing services?
  3. What will be the possibility of developing new practices and tools of personal archives?

This workshop will be part facilitated discussion and part exploratory discussion heading towards ideas to further develop.

Where & When? Saturday, August 2, 2014 @ 15:00, Archive Books , Dieffenbachstraße 31, 10967.

Yuk Hui, Ulrike Gollner, Agata Krolikowski, and Minuette Le are researchers, computer scientists, and designers working at the Hybrid Publishing Lab, part of the Centre for Digital Cultures at Leuphana Universität. We also work with the Hybrid Publishing Consortium on issues around open-source infrastructures for academics, small publishers and university publishers.

Suggested Reading

Warwick, Henry, Radical Tactics of the Offline Library, Institute for Network Cultures, Amsterdam Video: https://vimeo.com/95351775

Hui, Yuk, Archivist Manifesto, Centre for Digital Cultures, Leuphana Universität

Mattern, Shannon, Library as Infrastructure Reading room, social service center, maker-space. How far can we stretch the public library?

Please join us this upcoming Saturday – you find more about the workshop here.

Open Access mandate numbers are rising around the world. Browse institutions and policies here

Who hasn’t felt frustrated by not being able to access a piece of research online because of paywalls? The Open Access Button started their work in documenting paywalls late last year and have already tracked and mapped over 8300 paywalls since then. This week their launch coordinator Chealsye Bowley wrote a guest article for BioMedCentral, explaining what it is they do and how Open Access Button has progressed since their early beginnings. Read the full piece here. An introduction to BioMedCentral can be found here.

The International Association of Scientific, Technical & Medical Publishers published a set of open access licenses. According to the site “The licences on this page have been designed to provide easy to use, ready-made terms and conditions which publishers can adopt and/or adapt to the needs of their users.” Andrés Guadamuz was not so sure and took a look himself. Here’s what he found.

According to a headline of ITNEWS for australian business “Academics Get Personal Over Big Data”. The article explains how scholars are reacting to the big data movement and how data de-identification needs to be upgraded to protect academic research.

SPARC recognized the Electronic Information for Libraries (EIFL) with the July 2014 Innovator Award. EIFL has partnerships in over 50 member countries, empowers libraries, negotiates with publishers for affordable access to e-resources, and leads advocacy campaigns for Open Access to research literature and fair copyright.

The University of Nairobi is not only the oldest in Kenya, it is also an active supporter of open access policies. BioMedCentral also spoke to Agatha N. Kabugu, Deputy Director, and Milkah Gikunju, Repository Administrator of the University of Nairobi Library about their role in the movement, the role of the library today and open access research at the university. Read the full article here

Scholarly Open Access takes a critical stand against OMICS Groups publishing techniques. According to the article, OMICS misplaces credit and violates publishing policies. Read all about their “Predatory Publishing” here.

Jeffrey Marlow of WIRED published an article on obstacles for open access science. In the article, he discusses academia.edu, open access and peer review. Read it in full here.

ResearchGate has published an open call to contribute to a googledoc on the importance of citations on research work. The question was posted by a researcher at scientificcitations.org. See his full request here

A new open access journal was launched this week on Big Data and Society, which is also its title. The journal is a SAGE open access peer-reviewed scholarly journal for social sciences with an interdisciplinary approach. Its main goal is to connect debates around big data practices. Check it out here.

HOAJ-POSTER-header

Starting your own journal is not rocket science. To illustrate this, we boiled down our research on the topic and added some insights from David Solomon, Martin Eve, and other experts. And there it is: a poster that allows you to get an idea of the various aspects of Open Access journal publishing at a glance.

For the poster, we identified seven different issues covering the stages of planning, setting up, running, and sustaining your journal:

  • Scope and Content Strategy
  • People and Workflows
  • Journal Management
  • Design
  • Marketing and Distribution
  • Financing
  • Licenses

Each of these areas is provided with basic information, advice, illustrations, or key questions to ask yourself. The poster is rounded out by some useful key terms and a reference list including further readings, important organizations and links to journal management software and Open Access directories.

Please read, share, and enjoy! We are thankful for critique and feedback, for spreading the word, and passing on this poster to your friends, colleagues, and students. And please let us know when you start your own Open Access journal!

Numbers and shares of Open Access Journals in Sociology charging publication fees

logo_pds14If you don’t want to miss out on the future of publishing in the humanities, save this conference date: From the 12.11. – 14.11.2014 publishers, authors, researchers, programmers, designers, artists, hackers and entrepreneurs will discuss new developments in publishing and communication at Leuphana University’s conference in Lüneburg, Germany.

The Postdigital Scholar: Publishing between Open Access, Piracy and Public Spheres” will discuss new publishing trends, look at collaborative writing experiments and platforms for multimedia publishing. Our aim is to explore new tools and practices for gathering knowledge in order to seek out what this elusive thing could be: postdigital knowledge.

Date: 12. – 14.11.2014
Location: Lüneburg, Germany

We warmly welcome you to take part and very much hope to see you in November. So please save the date and register for free here.

Continue Reading…

Last weekend was the 20th anniversary of cognitive scientist Steven Harnad publishing what he called “A Subversive Proposal”. This open letter posted on a mailing list called upon all researchers to make their published papers freely available online. “Today the Subversive Proposal is viewed as one of the seminal texts of the open access movement” writes Richard Poynder on his blog Open and Shut. He got to ask Harnard nine questions, which the research answered here.

Continue Reading…

kickoff-open-science-de-2014-300x112OKFestival 2014 is encouraging people to plan and run fringe events to complement the festival, both before and after the official programming. One of these events will be a kick-off meeting for a German-speaking Open Science Working Group. We want to bring together the different spheres of opening up science in the German-speaking countries to focus more on the their scientific culture and specific aspects regarding the theme. Connecting the existing open scientists, learning from already started working groups and getting in touch with other open communities. It will consist of people from Germany, Austria, Switzerland and Liechtenstein.

Date: July 16, 2014, 19:00-23:00
Location: Open Knowledge Foundation Deutschland e.V.,
Singerstraße 109,
10179 Berlin

You find more Information and the Registration here.

Over the course of the last year we were working hard on establishing an experimental publishing outlet for the Hybrid Publishing Lab. As our first publication is finally completed we are happy to introduce meson press to you. Run by members of the lab the aim of meson press is to publish high quality Open Access monographs. Even though the scholarly book is changing its face in the age of digital media, we strongly believe in the many virtues of its format for academic communication. Some might claim that the book is dead. Nevertheless we are aiming to reinvent the book by developing creative solutions for scholarly publishing in the digital age.

meson press publishes research on digital cultures and networked media. Its publications challenge contemporary theories and advance key debates in the humanities today.

 

Rethinking Gamification
Today our first book will be released: Our friends of the Gamification Lab at the Centre for Digital Cultures of Leuphana University of Lüneburg have put together a formidable volume of articles that seek to rethink gamification. The book offers a candid assessment of the current gamification hype by tracing back its historical roots as well as exploring novel design practices and methods. The contributions to “Rethinking Gamification” (edited by Mathias Fuchs, Sonia Fizek, Paolo Ruffino and Niklas Schrape) furthermore critically discuss the social implications of this phenomenon and present artistic tactics for resistance. Read the full publication here. It’s open access!

Join us on Monday, June 30th, 2014, at 7 p.m. for the official book release of “Rethinking Gamification” at Mond­ba­sis (Lüner­tor­s­traße 20, Lüne­burg, Germany). Let’s talk about Gamification, future books to come, and upcoming topics. And last, but not least, let’s celebrate.

 

This week’s list of links starts with an entry posted on the Many Possibilities blog. The blog is maintained by Steve Song, Founder of Village Telco, a social enterprise that builds low-cost WiFi mesh VoIP technologies to deliver affordable voice and Internet in underserviced areas. His newest entry, titled “The Morality of Openness”, deals with the language of openness and uses three contemporary books to illustrate, how “Openness” is possibly not the right word to frame the movement that everyone seems to be passionately discussing.

In an attempt to cut through the relentless TED Talk-like optimism of ed tech marketing, this year at the HASTAC conference in Peru Sava Saheli Singh and Tim Maughan presented a series of fictional case studies on the future of technology in education. Within their presentation, they point to the fact that technologies are here, and available, however, they are not evenly distributed. View the case studies on medium.com.

On the New York Review of Books, Steve Coll applies himself to reviewing Brad Stone’s book “The Everything Store. Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon” (ironically, the link on the nybooks site, just like here, leads to amazon.com). The book tells the story of Amazon founder Jeff Bezos and Coll, with Stone, takes a critical look on the omnipotence that is Amazon. Read the full review here.

Endre Dányi and Joe Deville have recently taken part in a workshop on Experiments in Knowledge Production. The event brought together a number of OA publishing initiatives to examine the challenges of OA publishing and how these are faced in practice. On the Blog of the Centre for the Study of Invention & Social Process in Goldsmith, they have published their reflections on the workshop.

The Swiss National Science Foundation has interviewed the historian Monica Dommann on copyright logics and her new book on the history of copyright. Read what she has to say about debates on copyright and what that has to do with freedom and equality here.

Taylor & Francis apologises over censorship incident (without saying ‘sorry’ or ‘censorship’)

Scanning entire books falls under fair use policy according to a recent ruling

20140619-112435-41075974.jpg
“The First E-Book Fair in Germany”: The Electric Book Fair is an attempt at being able to view something that by its very nature must remain diffuse and undefinedbecause it is continually changing – a paradoxical but nevertheless worthwhile endeavour.

Find More Information here.

The Guardian is doing a round of Self-Publishing Q&As today. Join in between 1pm and 2.30pm and ask all you ever wanted to know about self-publishing. The panelists include Daniel Cooke of New Generation Publishing, Craig Pennington - editor-in-chief of the independent music magazine Bido Lito!, and several others.

Also in The Guardian, Ian Sample, Science editor, explains how secrecy over academic journal publishing contracts can veil the fact that many institutions are paying too much for journals.The article is just another in the last couple of months that criticize Elsevier’s paywalls.

The Indian non-profit Pratham Books, which publishes children’s books in local languages, has posted an article on self-publishing as an Indian tradition. In the article, Mahan Hazarika explains the benefits self-publishing has specifically for India, and how India measures up with other countries when it comes to publishing strategies.

HASTAC has extended an invite to participate in the Making Learning Connected MOOC. Sign ups are now open for the second Summer Learning Party, where participants will be encouraged to “hack thy writing”.

In a world where an ever increasing amount of data is generated and collected, those publishing the data must pay greater attention to putting the data into context, to increase its usability and impact – claims Alicia Asin, the co-founder and CEO of hardware provider Libelium, as expressed in a recent blog post on Gigaom. Asin explains “while it is true that we have access to more information than ever before, we are not experts on every subject. Thus, it is very difficult to digest it. My concern is that over-information is the new way of hiding information. If we demand context and facts instead of dumb numbers, the biggest legacy of the internet of things will be a world that is more transparent and democratic.“

Kevin Shively has recently reviewed LinkedIn’s publishing options and was surprised at how well the post performed. Read his full article on how data can help plan your posts on Simplymeasured.