What is a post-digital scholar?

Guest —  November 26, 2014 — Leave a comment

post-digital-scholar-conference-2014-hybrid-publishingThis is the first blog entry of a #pdsc14 review series on the Post-Digital Scholar Conference 2014 written by Luca Brenneckea, Student of the Leuphana University.

Everything is becoming Digital. MP3 crushed the vinyl record, YouTube obsoleted the DVD, and now the Kindle is scaring bookshops, publishers and authors alike. As the ephemerality of the Digital is disrupting the analog world order, there’s hardly any realm of our lives that is not at the brink of deep transformation. So is the case with academia. Once the pillar of Truth, the secularized religion of the 20th century, the archaic walls of academia are being sieged from from all sides. Continue Reading…

Academic publishing can free itself from its outdated path dependence by looking to alternative review mechanisms.

The last day of the Post-Digital Scholar Conference is over. Thanks to everyone who joined our #pdsc14 conference. It was thought provoking and inspiring conference and we had a great time! If you missed the conference, you can review the event in our third part of favorite #pdsc14 pickings – and don’t miss the outtakes on the bottom of this post or the other reviews: Continue Reading…

It has been a great start at the Post-Digital Scholar Conference – Day 1. If you missed day two or the whole conference, you can review the event in our second part of favorite #pdsc14 pickings – and don’t miss the outtakes on the bottom of this post: Continue Reading…

post-digital-scholar-conference-logo-o-leuphanaBefore I go into the first part of the Twitter Review of the Post-Digital Scholar Conference – Day 1, I’d like to thank everyone that joined this event. The Conference was certainly not my first conference this year, but it was (not surprisingly) one of my favorite.

But lets start with our favorite pickings of the first conference day – and don’t miss the outtakes on the bottom of this post or the other Reviews: Continue Reading…

Publishing between Open Access, Piracy and Public Spheres: New media is dead! Long live new media! For three days, publishers, researchers, programmers, designers, artists, and entrepreneurs will discuss how research and publishing in the humanities have changed over the past decade. The conference will explore new tools for gathering knowledge, examine platforms for multimedia publishing, or collaborative writing experiments.

Participants will focus on the interplay between pixels and print, and discuss open and closed modes of knowledge, in order to seek out what this elusive thing could be: post-digital knowledge.

You can download the conference poster here and the final program (PDF) here.

Follow the Conference on Twitter:

Jonas LiepmannJonas Liepmann is the founder of iversity. He studied cultural studies at the Humboldt-University, Berlin as well as comparative literary sciences at the Freie Universität Berlin. During his studies he developed the concept of iversity, for which he earned the financial support of EXIST – Gründen aus der Wissenschaft as well as of the EU, the state Brandenburg and private capital investors. Since the end of 2013 iversity offers MOOCs that have attracted more than 500.000 registered users to the platform.

Hybrid Publishing Lab: Are you working on anything at the moment that relates to our conference on post-digital scholarship or did you come across something interesting lately that deals with that topic? Continue Reading…

LandgrebeJonathan Landgrebe studied in Göttingen, Lyon, Berkeley and Munich and obtained his Ph.D. in Munich in field of economics, political sciences and law. In 2001 Jonathan joined the Center for Digital Technology and Management (CDTM), an interdisciplinary institute of LMU and TU Munich, to build up CDTM as a research institution and study program in digital technology management and entrepreneurship and became co-founder of a company in the converging field of digital publishing. His passion for books and literature and his experience in digital publishing made Jonathan join Suhrkamp, where he has been Managing Director since 2008. His work focuses on literature as well as non-fiction. He also he took over responsibilities for digital publishing at Suhrkamp.

Hybrid Publishing Lab: As part of the managing board you are in charge of the department of New Media. Will New Media decide the fate of publishers, or is the printed book here to stay? Continue Reading…

Open Access Irony Award Library

Bodó Balázs, is an economist and piracy researcher at the Institute for Information Law (IViR) at the University of Amsterdam. His academic interests include copyright and economics, piracy, media regulation, peer-to-peer communities, underground libraries, digital archives, and informal media economies. His recent book is on the role of P2P piracy in the Hungarian cultural ecosystem.

HPL: What is the impact but also the potential of piracy in our society?
Continue Reading…

NECSUS Starts Open Access Crowdsourcing Campaign

Dr Julianne NyhanNyhanJ is lecturer (assistant Professor) in Digital Information Studies in the Department of Information Studies, University College London. Her research interests include the history of computing in the Humanities and most aspects of digital humanities with special emphasis on meta-markup languages and digital lexicography. She has published widely, most recently Digital Humanities in Practice (Facet 2012), Digital Humanities: a Reader (Ashgate 2013) and Clerics, Kings and Vikings: essays on Medieval Ireland (Four Courts, at press). Among other things, she is a member of the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Peer Review College, the communications Editor of Interdisciplinary Science Reviews and a member of various other editorial and advisory boards. She is also PI of the ‘Hidden Histories: Computing and the Humanities c.1949–1980’ project. You can follow her on Twitter and on her Blog.

HPL: How do books become data, and what can we further expect of this development? Continue Reading…

The EFF wraps up a successful Open Access Week 2014. During the week, the EFF had posted new insights on open access every day. See all posts, as well as a recap on what happened, in posts, pictures and parties here.

According to phys.org, younger researchers are more willing to embrace open access. During Open Access Week, around 8000 researchers responded to the 2014 Taylor & Francis Open Access Survey, giving their views on everything from the benefits of open access to licence preferences, peer review to the future of academic publishing. Read a detailed summary of the survey here.

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posavec.stefanieStefanie Posavec moved from Denver, Colorado to London, UK for to complete an MA in Communication Design (Central Saint Martins) in 2004 and never went home. With a background in book/book cover design and text visualisation, she now mainly works as a designer with a focus on data-related design, with work ranging from data visualisation and information design to commissioned data art for a variety of clients. Her personal work often explores ideas of data craftsmanship and focuses on the visual representation of language, literature, or scientific topics. This work has been exhibited internationally at galleries including at the Museum of Modern Art (New York), the Victoria & Albert Museum, and Somerset House (London).

HPL: How do you go about translating language, literature and science into visual representations in your work? Continue Reading…

This has nothing to do with publishing, but is an interessting post of a member of the Hybrid Publishing Lab and his colleague Christian Herzog from Basic Media Provision 2.0. Continue Reading…