Check out the Open Steps event calender! The new site for open knowledge related projects aggregates worldwide resources to inform researchers in the field. You can find many upcoming Open Knowledge events taking place all across the globe. Never miss one again: check it out here.

The Open Access Button is launching a mobile app. This work is being funded by JISC as part of the Summer of Student Innovation initiative, and you can read the first of many blogposts updating on the development here.

As Colleges opened in the US last week, students are faced with a large sum to spend on textbooks for the following semester. Blair Horner, Legislative Director of the New York Public Interest Research Group, has commented on how the lack of open textbooks are holding back the country’s educational potential. Read and listen to the full piece here.

Scholarly Kitchen‘s Kent Anderson interviewed Gordon Nelson, President of the Council of Scientific Society Presidents (CSSP), after he had published an article in the Capitol Hill publication The Hill with the title: “What happens when you take something of value and give it away?”. Read the interview about public access policies, open access and the viability of scientific societies here.

Paul Barrett has written a rational post on implementing OA. While he is a self-declared advocate of OA, he identifies speed bumps and problems that need to be worked on. Read the full piece on his blog.

Open Access Heatmap: Number of Open Access Journals per Country

Who governs science? The guardian’s science section, occams corner, discusses the recent retraction of two papers on stem-cell research. According to the author of the article, Stephen Curry, this event marks the weaknesses of the self-regulatory process of peer review, which needs to be addressed by all scientists. Read the article in full here.

Laura Hazard Owen has covered recent protests of Amazons actions against book publisher bonnier in Germany. According to the article on Gigaom, more than 1100 German, Austrian and Swiss authors have a letter of protest to the company. Amazon has been delaying Bonnier book shipments (as a result of keeping fewer Bonnier titles in stock). Read the report here.

Sampo Viiri of the Finnish Institute in London blogged about Wikimania, the annual event of the Wikimedia movement which took place from the 8-10th of August in London. The event, a festival-congress-hybrid, included over 200 speakers in 8 simultaneous spaces inside the Barbican Centre, with fringe events and hackathons running during the event and preceding it. The full report is available here.

On a blogspot titled “Musings about Librarianship” an article describes how academic libraries might change when open access publishing becomes the norm. The piece predicts a larger change as was the case in the print-to-digital shift and questions whether or not the shift to open access is inevitable. Read in full here.

Jon Tennant has posted an article to the Open Access Button blog with thoughts on for-profit publishers, open access and academic culture. The OA enthusiast calls paywalls the “failure of publishers” to do the one job they were assigned to do. Read his critical piece here.

Proud2Know posted a small piece on 7 institutional benefits to implementing open access. The points were shared this summer on a joint SPARC Europe LIBER workshop in Riga as part of programme management work done for SPARC Europe. Check them out here.

What can publishing mean for theory today? Jussi Parikka asked us to explain our new project meson press

Firstly, a notification for the upcoming Open Access Week: The Right To Research Coalition has announced the Generation Open Grants for the 2014 international Open Access Week in October. Applications are still open and will close in a couple of days on August 18th at midnight Pacific Daylight Time (GMT – 7:00). Details are available here

Liat Clark has posted an article on WIRED magazine about how ‘Google Science’ could transform academic publishing. According to the article, WIRED UK has received documents revealing plans to release a platform, which brings together existing platforms like Google Docs, Google Plus etc. to create an OA model of scientific publishing. Read the whole story here.

Eldis.org has published a report on open access publishing from a developing country’s perspective. The paper by Jennifer I. Papin–Ramcharan and Richard A. Dawe, both teaching at the University of the West Indies presents experiences with open access publishing in Trinidad and Tobago. View the abstract and download the report here or view it on the web via the peer reviewed journal firstmonday.

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How the Past Defines the Present. Understanding the Path Dependancy of Academic Publishing

This week, there has been a lot of discussion around a recent report released by the Research Information Network, which relates the number of citations to an articles download performance. Paul Jump of Times Higher Education has written a summary of the study, which analyzed over 2000 articles on the hybrid science journal Nature Communications. However, Phil Davis of  The Scholarly Kitchen wonders whether Open Access is a “Cause or Effect” in that calculation.

Another debate has been picked up by The Guardian about whether the UK government should favor “gold” or “green” Open Access policies – the former making access freely available via the journal they are published in, the latter through a freely accessible university repository. Read the article in full here, and a short distinction of gold and green here, where Peter Suber tries to abolish harmful myths of open access publishing.

The EFF has published an article on the importance of the fight for open access, following the persecution of Colombian student Diego Gomez, who – like Aaron Swartz – has taken up the fight against closed knowledge databases and has to fear longterm imprisonment for breaking laws against piracy. Read about the very real political consequences of closed knowledge here.

 

Our colleague Julien from Mattering Press was recently hosting the interesting session: “Publish like you give a damn, careful experiments in academic” at an STS network meeting, when he stumbled across a surprising question. “Why should young academics write books, if articles are all that counts in evaluations?” Here is his answer. Continue Reading…

PDS_Poster_30714We would like to finally announce and invite you to a conference debating the future of publishing in the humanities from the 12.11. – 14.11.2014 in Lüneburg, Germany.

At the “Post-Digital Scholar Conference: Open Access, Piracy and Public Spheres“ national and international experts will share their research and findings. Publishers and academics, authors and designers, programmers and artists, hackers and entrepreneurs will discuss new developments in publishing and communication. The conference is organized by the Hybrid Publishing Lab of the Centre for Digital Culture at Leuphana University.

Participation is free of charge. Please register here. Our Website postdigitalscholar.org keeps you updated. You can donwload the conference poster here.

Archives often refer to institutional collections (as monuments of modernity) while with recent technological development, individual users can access to and own more and more digital objects, and it seems urgent to address the question of personal archives, that presents to us at the same time an epochal change as well as a political question. This talk address three main questions:

  1. Why is it necessary to talk about personal archives?
  2. How can one define a personal archive and its difference from existing cloud computing services?
  3. What will be the possibility of developing new practices and tools of personal archives?

This workshop will be part facilitated discussion and part exploratory discussion heading towards ideas to further develop.

Where & When? Saturday, August 2, 2014 @ 15:00, Archive Books , Dieffenbachstraße 31, 10967.

Yuk Hui, Ulrike Gollner, Agata Krolikowski, and Minuette Le are researchers, computer scientists, and designers working at the Hybrid Publishing Lab, part of the Centre for Digital Cultures at Leuphana Universität. We also work with the Hybrid Publishing Consortium on issues around open-source infrastructures for academics, small publishers and university publishers.

Suggested Reading

Warwick, Henry, Radical Tactics of the Offline Library, Institute for Network Cultures, Amsterdam Video: https://vimeo.com/95351775

Hui, Yuk, Archivist Manifesto, Centre for Digital Cultures, Leuphana Universität

Mattern, Shannon, Library as Infrastructure Reading room, social service center, maker-space. How far can we stretch the public library?

Please join us this upcoming Saturday – you find more about the workshop here.

Open Access mandate numbers are rising around the world. Browse institutions and policies here

Who hasn’t felt frustrated by not being able to access a piece of research online because of paywalls? The Open Access Button started their work in documenting paywalls late last year and have already tracked and mapped over 8300 paywalls since then. This week their launch coordinator Chealsye Bowley wrote a guest article for BioMedCentral, explaining what it is they do and how Open Access Button has progressed since their early beginnings. Read the full piece here. An introduction to BioMedCentral can be found here.

The International Association of Scientific, Technical & Medical Publishers published a set of open access licenses. According to the site “The licences on this page have been designed to provide easy to use, ready-made terms and conditions which publishers can adopt and/or adapt to the needs of their users.” Andrés Guadamuz was not so sure and took a look himself. Here’s what he found.

According to a headline of ITNEWS for australian business “Academics Get Personal Over Big Data”. The article explains how scholars are reacting to the big data movement and how data de-identification needs to be upgraded to protect academic research.

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HOAJ-POSTER-header

Starting your own journal is not rocket science. To illustrate this, we boiled down our research on the topic and added some insights from David Solomon, Martin Eve, and other experts. And there it is: a poster that allows you to get an idea of the various aspects of Open Access journal publishing at a glance.

For the poster, we identified seven different issues covering the stages of planning, setting up, running, and sustaining your journal:

  • Scope and Content Strategy
  • People and Workflows
  • Journal Management
  • Design
  • Marketing and Distribution
  • Financing
  • Licenses

Each of these areas is provided with basic information, advice, illustrations, or key questions to ask yourself. The poster is rounded out by some useful key terms and a reference list including further readings, important organizations and links to journal management software and Open Access directories.

Please read, share, and enjoy! We are thankful for critique and feedback, for spreading the word, and passing on this poster to your friends, colleagues, and students. And please let us know when you start your own Open Access journal!

Numbers and shares of Open Access Journals in Sociology charging publication fees

logo_pds14If you don’t want to miss out on the future of publishing in the humanities, save this conference date: From the 12.11. – 14.11.2014 publishers, authors, researchers, programmers, designers, artists, hackers and entrepreneurs will discuss new developments in publishing and communication at Leuphana University’s conference in Lüneburg, Germany.

The Postdigital Scholar: Publishing between Open Access, Piracy and Public Spheres” will discuss new publishing trends, look at collaborative writing experiments and platforms for multimedia publishing. Our aim is to explore new tools and practices for gathering knowledge in order to seek out what this elusive thing could be: postdigital knowledge.

Date: 12. – 14.11.2014
Location: Lüneburg, Germany

We warmly welcome you to take part and very much hope to see you in November. So please save the date and register for free here.

Continue Reading…